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Ovarian cancer risk

For women with an average risk

Chart with 100 figures to represent women, with 1 figure highlighted showing average risk for ovarian cancer
slide 1 of 3
    
slide 1 of 3, For women with an average risk,

Chart based on National Cancer Institute (2020). SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975–2017. http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2017/. Accessed July 31, 2020.

On average, about 1 out of 100 women will get ovarian cancer sometime during their lives. A woman's risk may be higher or lower depending on different factors. It most often affects women who are past menopause. You may be more likely to get it if other women in your family have had it. Also, some women inherit gene changes that increase their chances of getting it.

For women who have BRCA1 gene changes

Chart of 100 figures to represent women, with 44 figures highlighted showing ovarian cancer risk with BRCA1 gene changes
slide 2 of 3
    
slide 2 of 3, For women who have BRCA1 gene changes,

Chart based on Kuchenbaecker KB, et al. (2017). Risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. JAMA, 317(23): 2402–2416. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.7112. Accessed August 5, 2020.

Some women have BRCA1 gene changes. Their risk of getting ovarian cancer is higher than average. For these women, about 44 out of 100 of them will get ovarian cancer by age 80.

For women who have BRCA2 gene changes

Chart of 100 figures to represent women, with 17 figures highlighted showing ovarian cancer risk with BRCA2 gene changes
slide 3 of 3
    
slide 3 of 3, For women who have BRCA2 gene changes,

Chart based on Kuchenbaecker KB, et al. (2017). Risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. JAMA, 317(23): 2402–2416. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.7112. Accessed August 5, 2020.

Some women have BRCA2 gene changes. Their risk of getting ovarian cancer is also higher than average. For these women, about 17 out of 100 of them will get ovarian cancer by age 80.

Current as of: April 29, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Sarah Marshall MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Wendy Y. Chen MD, MPH MD, MPH - Medical Oncology, Hematology
Lesley Ryan MD - Family Medicine